Man Flu

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MAN FLU

Just caught a stinking cold.

Been tracking the blighter for days. First got wind of it last Tuesday, running wild in the local school.

Then heard it had been seen trying to get into the old folk’s home. I’ve been outside, waiting, watching. Thought at one point I’d missed it. I was about to call it a day when I saw it trying to sneak in with one of the cleaners. It never stood a chance. I had it safely neutralised and boxed in minutes.
Must rush, just had a message that Man Flu’s in town and needs dealing with.

Mike Jackson

Co-existence

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CO-EXISTENCE

“But doctor, what about this voice in my head?”
“Stress, Mr Carson. I’m going to give you a sick note for two weeks. I suggest you use that time for a relaxing holiday.”

I first entered Tim Carson’s body three weeks ago. He is desperately trying to rationalise my presence. I’ve done my best to explain what is happening but he won’t accept it. A shame really. I’d hoped we might co-exist harmoniously.

I will use this two week holiday to finalise a total merger.

By the time he goes back to work, he will be a new man.

Mike Jackson

What Harm Will It Do You?

A 100-word story by Mike Jackson

WHAT HARM WILL IT DO YOU?

Go on, you know you want to. What harm will it do?

Look at those pretzels. Don’t they smell yummy!

Or what about a big, fat, juicy hotdog with lashings of onions, covered in tomato ketchup?

Tell you what, I’ll cover my eyes. That way I won’t see you.

Honest, I promise, I won’t peak. I’ll keep them covered until you’ve finished. That way nobody else will know anything about it.

We’ll keep it a secret between the two of us.

And when you’ve finished I’ve got some ideas as to other temptations you might like to give in to.

Mike Jackson

A 100-word story for Friday Fictioneers.

Photo prompt courtesy of  © Roger Bultot

Daddy

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DADDY

I wonder if I’ll recognise him.

It was 20 years ago. Went off with the barmaid from the Red Lion. Or at least that’s what Aunty Sue said.

I just remember how much I missed my dad. In the midst of all the anger and shouting, I simply cried.

Then I spot him. Coming towards me. He’s just as I remember him. Older but still that sparkle in his eyes.

I smile but he doesn’t notice.

Then someone shouts ‘Daddy’ and runs towards him. He hurries past me.

Then the tears start. Just as they had all those years ago.

Mike Jackson

100-wordstoryfor this week’s Friday Fictioneers prompt.

PHOTO PROMPT © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

The Battleground

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THE BATTLEGROUND

I’m not surprised it should end here.

This has always been the hub of our home. Evening meals as a family, the kids covering the table with their homework.

Then, when they left home, it became our battleground. You occupying one end of the kitchen table me the other. Taking turns to throw barbed comments and hateful accusations across no-man’s land.

I’m not sure what was different about today. It might have been something you said but I can’t think what. I simply remember screaming, lashing out, hitting you again and again with that old iron.

So utterly satisfying.

 

Mike Jackson

100-word story for Friday Fictioneers.

Where Are You?

A 100-word story.

WHERE ARE YOU?

 

I remember it as though it happened yesterday.

It was my seventh birthday and dad had stuck a donkey on the wall.

We’d laughed when Jimmy pinned the tail on the left leg.

Then it was my go. When I finally stuck that tail onto the donkey nobody laughed, so I thought I’d done OK. Funny thing was, nobody clapped or cheered either.

When I took that blindfold off and turned around there was not a person in sight.

I’ve been travelling these roads for nigh on two years now – so far I’ve yet to come across another living soul.

Mike Jackson

A 100-word story for this week’s photo prompt at Friday Fictioneers.

Photo courtesy of – J Hardy Carroll

Olympic Standard

A 100-word story for Friday Fictioneers.

OLYMPIC STANDARD

 

Gave it all up when I was fourteen.

Nobody could understand why.

I simply reacted like any teenager. Scowled a lot. Said it was boring and I’d better things to do with my life.

I never mentioned Neil.

The ever-popular, charismatic Mr Neil Samuels. The charming ex-professional who used to keep me behind at the end of sessions for extra tuition. The same dependable man who made me promise not to tell anyone about our little secret.

They said I was good. Olympic standard at least.

Nowadays I can’t go near a swimming pool without being violently sick.

 

Mike Jackson

PHOTO PROMPT © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

A 100-word story for the prompt at Friday Fictioneers.